Wifi Printer

I have a WiFi printer which recognises my router. My PC is connected to the router by wire. I assume that it’s possible to do this, rather than connecting my PC directly to the printer by using a WiFi card in my PC.

When I use Settings > Printers > Add-Printer it comes up with CUPS-BRF-Printer and names a completely different sort of printer (HP Designjet T920 PostScript). Nothing happens when I attempt to print to it.

It could be someone else’s printer, but I don’t think it’s likely that they would leave it switched on for a long time. It still comes up even when my printer is off. Is that name just a default? How would I know whether my PC has found my printer through my router?

(I’ve tried typing ufw in a terminal and it’s not installed, can I assume there is therefore no firewall?)

If the printer name you see is not the one that matches your own printer, and especially if it shows when your printer is powered off, then you should assume it is a neighbors printer and probably should not be used (unless you want to send them some sort of message about their printer being available to anyone).

As far as your own printer is concerned, it certainly can be done with the pc connected by wire and the printer connected by wifi.

You did not comment on whether your printer is usable or not, nor did you tell us what it is and what name it shows.

For my wifi printer I set the IP as a fixed address (reserved on my dhcp server [router]) then it is easily usable.

My printer is on (standby) 24x7 so that is a seemingly bad assumption.

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If the printer name you see is not the one that matches your own printer, and especially if it shows when your printer is powered off, then you should assume it is a neighbors printer and probably should not be used (unless you want to send them some sort of message about their printer being available to anyone).

I have already printed a document which sent an appropriate message.

You did not comment on whether your printer is usable or not,

The printer is usable when connected by wire.

nor did you tell us what it is and what name it shows.

It’s a Canon MG6150 and this name is printed on the top.

For my wifi printer I set the IP as a fixed address (reserved on my dhcp server [router]) then it is easily usable.

Sorry, I have no idea what you mean.

I assume you mean ethernet wire.

This name should show when you are configuring your printer.

Your router should have a management interface that can be used to configure the network, and should also provide the IP addresses for devices on your LAN with DNCP. Within that interface it usually is possible to set a reserved ip address for the MAC of each device that attaches to your router whether via ethernet or wifi. Once that ip address is reserved for use with that MAC address the device will always be assigned the same IP address – it is reserved for that device – in this case you would set it for the printer.
Once that is done the printer will remain at the same IP in your LAN so it can easily be configured and accessed – its address should never change.

Note also that connecting to a wifi access point almost always requires that the device being connected has a password configured to complete the connection. This means the user must set up the wifi connection at the printer control panel before being able to use a wifi printer.

The fact it works when ‘wired’ but does not with wifi seems to indicate you may not have set up the wifi on the printer correctly.

The firewall in Fedora is managed by firewalld and configured by for example firewall-config or firewall-cmd. You can install ufw if you wish.

So far…
I consulted the manual for the router and it says to type http://999.999.9.9 in the browser, that’s a familiar way of checking the router. It shows a Canon printer when my Canon printer is on and not when it’s off, so I conclude that it’s my printer and that the router password I had entered on the printer has worked. It showed an address like 99:99:99:99:xx:xx . I went back into the printer setup where it is names an HP printer, renamed it, entered the address (I tried with and without http://) and selected the driver.

I’m now puzzling about why they have different formats. Printing doesn’t work.

Does the printer support AirPrint or Mopria? If so, it should work with Cups Driverless.

Does the printer support AirPrint or Mopria?

Internet says:

About AirPrint

AirPrint is an Apple technology that helps you create full-quality printed output without the need to download or install drivers. With AirPrint technology, it’s easy to print full-quality photos and documents from your Mac, iPhone, or iPad.

What is Mopria - Mopria Alliance

Mopria is a set of standards that enable printing from a mobile device to printers from different manufacturers or brands.

I’m not sure how these might be relevant to my attempt to print from a computer running Fedora.

firewalld
If possible I’ll install gufw (as I’m familiar with it) and investigate whether the firewall is stopping me printing.

Apple’s AirPrint Printers List does not contain Canon MG6150. I think that printer predates AirPrint. Canon support for Airprint started with MG62xx. Mopria Certifified Products does find Canon MG6150.

Gutenprint Supported Printers does include Canon MG6150.

It is relevant for the correct configuration of your printer and for cups as well.

So I should disbelieve this then? “from your Mac, iPhone, or iPad.” “from a mobile device”.

firewalld

Fedora hasn’t got gufw unfortunately and I can’t find any clear instructions on the Web to install it. So I’ve tried firewalld as you suggested and it comes up with this:

bash-5.2$ firewall-cmd --list-all
FedoraWorkstation (default, active)
  target: default
  ingress-priority: 0
  egress-priority: 0
  icmp-block-inversion: no
  interfaces: enp4s7
  sources: 
  services: dhcpv6-client mdns samba-client ssh
  ports: 1025-65535/udp 1025-65535/tcp
  protocols: 
  forward: yes
  masquerade: no
  forward-ports: 
  source-ports: 
  icmp-blocks: 
  rich rules:

I doesn’t give me the impression that it is blocking access to the printer.

No
Believe it in addition to that.
Note that what is told to you there is focused on the Apple perspective and they do not venture outside the silo of what they make available nor do they infer that there are other ways to do the same thing. Doing so would be bad for their own interests.

Linux has ways to use the same connections.

I think you are suggesting to use it to set up the printer rather than to print then. However, one talks about buying it for Windows and the other mentions using an Android app. That is getting too complicated for me. I am not familiar with either of those two OSs so would rather stick with Linux.

In addition, since I can print using a wire, I don’t think the printer needs configuring, rather it is the WiFi connection that is the problem.

Once the printer is configured by hplip then anything on the pc can print to that device. Hplip is not a print manager. It merely creates the printer definition and installs the driver for that printer so it can be properly used by cups for printing.

As stated above

  1. the printer must be able to connect to the access point by wifi
  2. the printer needs to have a dedicated IP so dhcp does not assign a random ip to that device. If the dhcp server is not told to reserve the IP for that specific device then it may at some time be given a different (random) IP which would break printing.
  3. The pc must be configured to connect to that printer at the assigned IP.

If all these are done then the printer should always be available for printing on your lan.

Once the printer is configured by hplip

According to the terminal this is not installed on my PC.
Could you give me a frank answer to this question: Do people really use WiFi on Linux or is it just something that geeks can do?
In the past I have used GUFW to connect my PC via the modem to my Windows laptop, perhaps I should send the documents to that Windows device and print from that, or just put up with another wire.

You could also consider that the CUPS project for many years was an Apple project, but it is now moved to https://github.com/OpenPrinting/cups.git. CUPS can talk natively to AirPrint printers, and as AirPrint and Mopria is almos identical, CUPS can talk natively to Mopria printers in the same way as Android devices can.

Of course they do. And with some router/modem boxes you can consider the wifi and the cabled network as one single network. That is, a cable connected computer can talk to an Android device connected by WiFi.

I have been using wifi for my PC (multiple PCs actually) for many years, and I am sure a majority of users do so in today’s world. Hardwired networking seems a thing of the past in most homes though it is still very much used in enterprises.

My printer is wifi and I have had it for over 7 years and moved it with me 3 different times.

My home has one ethernet hardwire installed – between the ISP modem and my router. My PCs, TVs, and other wifi devices (including my irobot vacuum cleaner) connect to the router/AP from wherever they are in the house.